Сохрани мою речь навсегда

Friday 24.02.

19:30

Sands Films

a.k.a. KEEP MY WORDS FOREVER


get your Tickets here


2015, Russia

Director Roma Liberov is present

rated 12 y. +

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvXXb7jyhfo

Осип Мандельштам – высший образец жизни и работы Поэта в России.

Государство целилось убить и забыть его стихотворения.

Первое удалось: оголодавший, замёрзший, обезумевший поэт погиб в лагере. А стихи остались. Их сохранила жена, Надежда Мандельштам, запомнив всё написанное и дождавшись “вегетарианских времён”.

Благодаря ей мы знаем ни на что не похожее: “Сохрани мою речь навсегда за привкус несчастья и дыма…”

Osip Mandelstam’s story epitomises an experience of Russian poets.

The Soviet state strove to kill him and to obliterate his poems.

They succeeded in extinguishing his life, but not his work: cold, starvation and torture drove him to madness and death in the camps, yet his poems lived on. His wife, Nadezhda Mandelstam, saved them by memorising everything he had written and keeping them until less Siberian times.

Thanks to her, we know the incomparable ‘Keep my words forever, because of their taste of unhappiness and smoke..’

This is the story of the poet, remade at the intersection of different arts and genres: puppet theatre, design, computer graphics, and documentary.

* The movie exists under two different names in translation.
Please don’t be confused -they are used interchangably.


An article from the page of European Design Awards

The documentary ‘Save My Speech Forever’ tells a story of Osip Mandelshtam, one of the most significant Russian poets of the twentieth century. The poet’s rebellious spirit challenged the Soviet authorities and he was arrested for ‘counter-revolutionary activity’.
Mandelshtam was sentenced to deportation to Siberia and died in a transit camp near Vladivostok on 27 December 1938, starved, sick, frozen and mentally ill. Witnesses remembered that during the last months of his life Mandelstam was succumbing to insanity. The name of Osip Mandelstam was prohibited for more than 20 years after he passed away. Only in the second half of the 20th century did Mandelstam’s creative work became well known and appreciated.

Mandelshtam’s wife Nadezhda literally saved the poet’s speech memorizing everything he had written. As it was too dangerous and illegal to keep any records containing Mandelshtam’s poetry for more than 20 years Nadezhda spent every night learning, silently reciting his poems and copying by hand in order to save them. Only thanks to her memory we can read these poems today.
‘Osip Mandelshtam is one of the most important poetic events that happened to the Russian language in the twentieth century. At the same time it’s one of the most tragic fates in the history of our literature. His poetry is extremely tied up to the epoch he lived in and its events’. (Roma Liberov, director).

The movie encompasses a wide range of various genres and mediums: documentary, motion graphics, collage, animation, digital art and puppet theatre.
We were extremely excited to take part in this project. We were responsible for the design of 21 animated chapters of the movie, which finally made a promotional trailer, a promotional poster and a series of editorial promotional illustrations.
The movie consists of twenty-one chapters telling about the meaningful events of the poet’s life. Each chapter is preceded by animation sequences using the visual language and symbolism of Orthodox iconography and Russian avant-garde at the same time.
Icon-inspired animation merged with the key images of Mandelshtam’s poetry aims to communicate the poet’s inner states.

Being accompanied by the subtitle ‘For all innocent victims killed by their country’ the movie structure refers to hagiographies of the first Christian martyrs and saints.
Images beholden to traditional iconography with richly tangible craquelure combined with the pioneering techniques of Russian Constructivist artists – collage and photomontage – illustrate that ambivalent state of being between Scylla and Charybdis of the two epochs faced by many liberal-minded people of that time.
As a part of the movie promotional campaign we designed a series of promotional editorial illustrations containing twenty-one Mandelshtam’s poems with illustrations opening each chapter of the movie.

Using most iconic and repetitive images of Mandelshtam’s poetry each illustration is a window into another time that is more real than here and now.
Graphic style of the illustrations embraces artistic methods widely used by the Orthodox icon painters and Russian avant-garde artists such as multidimensionality, reverse perspective, non-objective geometricity and colour symbolism. These techniques were rediscovered and rethought by the avant-garde artists in their effort to break out from the dominating representational art forms of the past.
These combinations of the old and the new, rethinking of old shapes and metaphors from the new perspective, conjunction of history and innovation are distinctive features of Mandelshtam’s poetry.

Shostakovich – From Jewish Folk Poetry

View the
music recording
and our
introduction here.

After his fearsome 1948 condemnation at the hands of the Union of Composers and Stalin’s ‘cultural’ henchman Andrey Zhdanov, Shostakovich was understandably careful about what he composed next and what he revealed in public. His position was undoubtedly dangerous. In the autumn of the same year he compiled a strikingly unusual  song-cycle for three singers and piano: the texts were taken from a collection of Russian translations of Jewish lyrics, mostly originally in Yiddish but one or two Hebrew or Russian; the melodies he created were original but closely related to the style of ‘klezmer’ music which Shostakovich knew and loved. The ensemble of three singers gives almost the feeling of a chamber opera.

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Innocent Saturday – 2011, Mindadze

See the introduction

and Q&A session here.

Screening and talk with the director

We welcome you to a second movie of our guest Alexander Mindadze. This, like the previous one, is based on a true story. As visceral and fragmented as life itself, the story is a dance on the volcano – relentless in style, events and characters.

Set over some 36 hours, the film begins at night, with Valery, an engineer and party official, running desperately to get to Chernobyl, rushing up roads and through undergrowth. The first we hear of events, it seems there have been some containable explosions, but when the camera wanders into a meeting of despairing bigwigs, it emerges that the main reactor has blown – as signaled by an ominous glow in the night sky. Continue reading

MY GOOD HANS – 2015, Mindadze

Screening and talk with the director

German with English subtitles. Q&A in Russian, English translation.

It is the spring of 1941. German engineer Hans and his colleagues arrive at a USSR glass manufacturing factory. The Soviet Union is to deliver raw materials to Germany – in exchange for the latest industrial machinery and technologies. It quickly becomes apparent this is not the whole story and both sides have the foreboding of things to come. Yet they meet as people and become friends.

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Alexandra – Александра

Screening

Russia, France – Sokurov, 2009

A Russian grandmother (Galina Vishnevskaya, a famous Russian opera singer) visiting her grandson Denis (Vasily Shevtsov), a sergeant in the Russian army. He’s stationed at a remote Chechen outpost, and from the moment Alexandra arrives, she is out of place. The army base is barren and secluded, a closed system with its own code and structure. This visitor creates an immediate juxtaposition between the outside and the inside, and Sokurov patiently tracks the old woman as she explores the camp, talking to soldiers, and even going beyond its perimeter to the local market, where she befriends some of the occupied people.

(A longer review – rogerebert.com/reviews/alexandra-2008)

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Мать – Mother

Mother – a silent movie by Vsevolod Pudovkin, 1926

Structures shaping into motion, motions reshaping into structure, against each other, so that the whole thing is like a snowstorm rolling down a hill; gathering itself to itself. Which is to say the people to the people, in an effort at once to reshape and portray the reshaped world.

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Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears

Vladimir Menshov (1979)

Moscow of the late ’50s is the initial setting for this movie of three young girls out for love – the upwardly mobile Lyuda (Irina Muravyova), the secure Tonya (Raisa Ryazanova) and the head-over-heels Katya (Vera Alentova). The film re-engages the trio 20 years later, focusing on their varied life changes.

John Bush for allmovie.com


Москва пятидесятых годов. Три молодые провинциалки приезжают в Москву в поисках того, что ищут люди во всех столицах мира — любви, счастья и достатка. Их судьбы складываются именно так, как предполагает характер каждой из девушек.

 

Reserve your seat at Sands Films

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HEAVY WATER – Mario Petrucci

On April 26th, 1986, reactor four at Chernobyl nuclear power station explodes, sending an enormous radioactive cloud over Northern Ukraine and neighbouring Belarus. The danger is kept a secret from the rest of the world and the nearby population who go about their business as usual. May Day celebrations begin, children play and the residents of Pripyat marvel at the spectacular fire raging at the reactor. After three days, an area the size of England becomes contaminated with radioactive dust, creating a ‘zone’ of poisoned land.

 

Feature
On his page ⇒

Introduction
On Atomic TV ⇒

Trailer
On Youtube ⇒

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